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11 TIPS……………………
FOR TEACHERS OF THE GIFTED AND TALENTED
1. LET THEM SHOW YOU WHAT THEY KNOW

COMPACT THE CURRICULUM
Generally, the work that we plan for our students is really “our work,” according to Dr. Joseph Renzulli. It doesn’t become “their work” until it represents true learning for them. Give all students the opportunity to write a pretest- if they do not get an “A” it does not count (some will choose not to – give them small group instruction while the others are writing the pretest). Students who get an above 83% choose to do a higher level thinking activity that represents meaningful learning to them (can or cannot be related to the topic).
2. MOST DIFFICULT FIRST
Gifted students can learn new concepts more quickly than their age peers. They need much less practice than your average students. Allow students complete about 5 of the most difficult problems or exercises first before doing rest of assignment. If they understand it they are free to choose activities that interest them (ongoing project, reading, enrichment or anything that doesn’t disturb others). Evaluation: when they meet the criteria set by you, their “A” for that work becomes their letter grade for entire assignment.
3. DIFFERENT, NOT MORE—
Research shows that 40% to 50% of the content might be adapted for gifted students. It is important for educators to provide alternative challenging activities for them to do instead of grade level work. Discover what their interests are and build projects around those interests. Encourage them to self select topics on a conceptual rather than a factual basis.
4. OFFER THEM CHOICES BASED ON THEIR INTERESTS AND TALENTS
Thrill them with choices, choices and more choices. When you're establishing learning opportunities, provide more than one choice for them to demonstrate understanding. Let them write a brochure or create a dramatization if they find that more interesting. Trust them to learn in non-traditional ways.

Gifted students are passionate about topics that are not connected to the curriculum, which is one reason why school can be frustrating for them. Once they have shown you they understand the concepts, allow them the opportunity to learn something they are interested in.
5. CHANGE YOUR APPROACH
Become "the facilitator." Rather than just "giving" them information, help them to discover it! Let go of the idea of normal. Think outside the box.
Drill and practice may cause boredom which escalates into unacceptable behaviors. Keep them challenged. Provide ongoing challenging activities with a problem solving focus. For instance, instead of saying, “What is the perimeter of this 4 x 3 rectangle?” Pose it this way: “How many different rectangles can you make with a perimeter of 14 units?” Give them dot paper or geoboards to discover the solutions. Ask if they've found all of the rectangles and do they know if the have.
6. OFFER
OPPORTUNITIES FOR HIGH LEVEL THINKING
Use key words and phrases, which are really question prompts and critical thinking probes, including concepts and terms such as casual relationships, possible futures, trends, assumptions, purposes, and analogies.

Discuss global themes and thought-provoking generalizations, which also harness the power of language, including concepts and terms such as patterns, order, survival, power, cycles, and change (i.e. - “Change” – may be good or bad, change occurs in our lifetime)

Bloom’s Taxonomy helps promote high level thinking (evaluating, synthesizing, analyzing etc.)

Ask questions with how, why and should.
7. DON”’T ALWAYS MAKE THEM “TEACHER HELPER”
Some teachers may have their gifted students help other children in math or reading because they were the first ones finished their work, or be a “teacher substitute” in the class. Gifted children think differently than other students and asking them to tutor other kids can be a frustrating experience for all parties involved.
7. ENCOURAGE A SENSE OF HUMOR
Many of these children are looked upon as being rude when they are really quite precocious and simply want to find things out. Have fun with them.
8. SET RULES AND BE CONSISTENT
Bright children can think of one thousand ways of getting out of doing work as opposed to fifty ways by another child. They can spot your weaknesses quickly and sometimes play parents against one another.
9. HELP THEM SET REALISTIC GOALS
Some gifted children set very high standards for themselves and feel a need to be perfect in all they do. We, as teachers and parents, must let them know that to do their best is good enough and to be comfortable with that.

The teacher must be flexible enough to allow them to be free and to experiment without constant interference or suggestions. Allowing them to make mistakes is very important for these children, showing them that making mistakes does not mean failure but a chance to grow.
10. PROVIDE PEER SUPPORT
Peer support is critical. Children need opportunities to work with intellectual peers. Some gifted children may seem socially inept when we observe them with their age peers. But put them together with like minds and many function just fine. Provide opportunity for gifted students to work with their intellectual peers in the classroom, school, and at the district level.
11. INVOLVE THE PARENTS
Parents and teachers must share in the education of a child. You can’t over communicate. Connecting with parents allows you to become acquainted with a child’s interests and abilities outside the boundaries of the classroom. Share ideas, them to help find materials, and let them feel like part of the team working together to support their child.
What is Gifted?
http://caiutube.caiu.org/giftedinpa/features/PzZ_1XaXWc_IqS9fTr3j
This 30 minute podcast lays out the definition of gifted both nationally and in Pennsylvania. The identification process is talked about in general terms.

Enrichment and Acceleration
http://caiutube.caiu.org/giftedinpa/features/9kg7N1wiSEAhZk8GyZTu

A Gifted Child Checklist for Teachers: An insight on the gifted student you are teaching
http://crushingtallpoppies.com/2014/06/09/a-gifted-child-checklist-for-teachers/

Why are Gifted Programs Needed
https://www.nagc.org/resources-publications/gifted-education-practices/why-are-gifted-programs-needed
https://www.mentalhelp.net/articles/why-are-gifted-and-talented-programs-necessary/

Gifted Kids at Risk: Who's Listening?
http://sengifted.org/archives/articles/gifted-kids-at-risk-whos-listening

Understanding the Emotional Complexity of a Gifted Child
http://www.psy-ed.com/wpblog/emotional-complexity-gifted-child/

Challenging Gifted Students in the Regular Education Classroom
http://www.gifted.uconn.edu/siegle/tag/Digests/e513.html

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Ten Ways to Annoy a Gifted Child
http://www.giftedguru.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/Top-Ten-Ways-to-Annoy-a-Gifted-Child.pdf

Teaching Gifted Kids in Today's Regular Education Classroom
http://www.nagc.org/index.aspx?id=660

Gifted Students: Recommendations for Teachers
http://www.education.udel.edu/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/GiftedStudents.pdf


Myths in Gifted Education


Gifted Learners in the Regular Classroom


You know your child's gifted when . . .
http://www.freespirit.com/files/OTHER/YouKnowYourChildIsGiftedWhen.pdf

Gifted learners prefer idea-mates rather than age-mates. They enjoy the company of peers when the peer group understands the shared ideas.

A High Achiever...
A Gifted Learner...
A Creative Thinker...

Remembers the answers.
Poses unforeseen questions.
Sees exceptions.
Is interested.
Is curious.
Wonders.
Is attentive.
Is selectively mentally engaged.
Daydreams; may seem off task.
Generates advanced ideas.
Generates complex, abstract ideas.
Overflows with ideas, many of which will never be developed.
Works hard to achieve.
Knows without working hard.
Plays with ideas and concepts.
Answer the questions in detail.
Ponders with depth and multiple perspectives.
Injects new possibilities.
Performs at the top of the group.
Is beyond the group.
Is in own group.
Responds with interest and opinions.
Exhibits feelings and opinions from multiple perspectives.
Shares bizarre, sometimes conflicting opinions.
Learns with ease.
Already knows.
Questions: What if...
Needs 6 to 8 repetitions to master.
Needs 1 to 3 repetitions to master.
Questions the need for mastery.
Comprehends at a high level.
Comprehends in-depth, complex ideas.
Overflows with ideas--many of which will never be developed.
Enjoys the company of age peers.
Prefers the company of intellectual peers.
Prefers the company of creative peers but often works alone.
Understands complex, abstract humor.
Creates complex, abstract humor.
Relishes wild, off-the-wall humor.
Grasps the meaning.
Infers and connects concepts.
Makes mental leaps: Aha!
Completes assignments on time.
Initiates projects and extensions of assignments.
Initiates more projects that will ever be completed.
Is receptive.
Is intense.
Is independent and unconventional.
Is accurate and complete.
Is original and continually developing.
Is original and continually developing.
Enjoys school often.
Enjoys self-directed learning.
Enjoys creating.
Absorbs information.
Manipulates information.
Improvises.
Is a technician with expertise in a field.
Is an expert who abstracts beyond the field.
Is an inventor and idea generator.
Memorizes well.
Guesses and infers well.
Creates and brainstorms well.
Is highly alert and observant.
Anticipates and relates observations.
Is intuitive.
Is pleased with own learning.
Is self-critical.
Is never finished with possibilities.
Gets A's.
May not be motivated by grades.
May not be motivated by grades.
Is able.
Is intellectual.
Is idiosyncratic.
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